The U.S. wants ByteDance to sell TikTok. China is almost certainly going to refuse

image via cnbc.com
image via cnbc.com

The House on Wednesday approved a bill that requires ByteDance to divest TikTok within roughly six months in order for the app “to remain available in the United States.” However, China would likely block a sale of TikTok U.S., analysts told CNBC.

https://www.cnbc.com/2024/03/14/tiktok-ban-china-would-block-sale-of-short-video-app.html

Vending machine error reveals secret face image database of college students

image via arstechnica.com
image via arstechnica.com

Canada-based University of Waterloo is racing to remove M&M-branded smart vending machines from campus after outraged students discovered the machines were covertly collecting facial-recognition data without their consent. The scandal started when a student using the alias SquidKid47 posted an image on Reddit showing a campus vending machine error message, "Invenda.Vending.FacialRecognitionApp.exe," displayed after the machine failed to launch a facial recognition application that nobody expected to be part of the process of using a vending machine.

https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2024/02/vending-machine-error-reveals-secret-face-image-database-of-college-students/

Apple confirms it’s breaking iPhone web apps in the EU on purpose

image via techcrunch.com
image via techcrunch.com

“Addressing the complex security and privacy concerns associated with web apps using alternative browser engines would require building an entirely new integration architecture that does not currently exist in iOS and was not practical to undertake given the other demands of the DMA and the very low user adoption of Home Screen web apps. And so, to comply with the DMA’s requirements, we had to remove the Home Screen web apps feature in the EU,” the website reads.

https://techcrunch.com/2024/02/15/apple-confirms-its-breaking-iphone-web-apps-in-the-eu-on-purpose

Feds Want to Ban the World’s Cutest Hacking Device. Experts Say It’s a ‘Scapegoat’

image via vice.com
image via vice.com

"We shouldn't be blaming manufacturers of radio transmitters for security lapses in the wireless unlock mechanisms of cars," Bill Budington, Senior Staff Technologist at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, said in a statement to Motherboard. "Flipper Zero devices, because of their ease of use, are convenient scapegoats to blame for gaping security holes in fob implementations by car manufacturers. Banning Flipper Zero devices is tantamount to banning a multi-tool because it can be used for vandalism, or banning markers because they can be used for graffiti. Moreover, tools like the Flipper Zero are used by security researchers involved in researching and hardening the security of systems like car fobs—banning them will result in tangible harms."

https://www.vice.com/en/article/4a388g/flipper-zero-ban-canada-hacking-car-thefts

Canada to Ban Flipper Zero Devices Over Car Thefts

image via pcmag.com
image via pcmag.com

Canada’s Minister Innovation, Science and Industry François-Philippe Champagne announced the ban on Thursday, explaining that “criminals have been using sophisticated tools to steal cars. And Canadians are rightfully worried.” “Today, I announced we are banning the importation, sale and use of consumer hacking devices, like flippers, used to commit these crimes,” he tweeted.

https://www.pcmag.com/news/canada-to-ban-flipper-zero-devices-over-car-thefts

Viral news story of botnet with 3 million toothbrushes was too good to be true

image via arstechnica.com
image via arstechnica.com

Alas, fiction is sometimes stranger than truth. There weren't really 3 million Internet-connected toothbrushes accessing the website of a Swiss company in a DDoS attack that did millions of dollars of damage. The toothbrush botnet was just a hypothetical example that some journalists wrongly interpreted as having actually happened.

https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2024/02/viral-news-story-of-botnet-with-3-million-toothbrushes-was-too-good-to-be-true/

Three million malware-infected smart toothbrushes used in Swiss DDoS attacks — botnet causes millions of euros in damages

image via tomshardware.com
image via tomshardware.com

In this particular case, the toothbrush botnet was thought to have been vulnerable due to its Java-based OS. No particular toothbrush brand was mentioned in the source report. Normally, the toothbrushes would have used their connectivity for tracking and improving user oral hygiene habits, but after a malware infection, these toothbrushes were press-ganged into a botnet.

https://www.tomshardware.com/networking/three-million-malware-infected-smart-toothbrushes-used-in-swiss-ddos-attacks-botnet-causes-millions-of-euros-in-damages